Folded Aluminum Lamps Project Feathers and Antlers When Illuminated

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When Tel Aviv-based designer Chen Bikovski was growing up she was fascinated by pop-up books, especially engaged with the immersive experience that came with the turn of each page. Interested in transforming this idea to work with her design practice, Bikovski founded Popup Lighting, a series of lamps that turn into magical creatures like deer and peacocks when illuminated.

“The idea behind Popup Lighting was to create a permanent light fixture that would bring a magical ambiance to any space,” said Bikovski on her website. “A multi-dimensional light that would inspire the senses and ignite the imagination.”

Bikovski’s fixtures seem like minimal aluminum sculptures until their light is switched on—the origami-like works suddenly appearing as deer or peacocks. Streams of light behind the lamps create the effect of horns and feathers, subtly casting patterns that make each work come alive.

Both of her designs can be found on the Popup Lighting shop in an array of colors. You can see more on her Instagram, while also taking a look at some light experiments with cacti that may soon join the shop! (via My Modern Met)

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New Modernist Sandcastles Constructed 

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Artist Calvin Seibert spent part of the summer on Rockaway Beach in Queens where he made quick work of erecting several of his trademark geometric sandcastles that we’ve admired for years here on Colossal. Seibert is a professional sculptor who relishes the challenge of building these temporary sand structures inspired by brutalist architecture and aspects of modernism. He shares about his process:

Building “sandcastles” is a bit of a test. Nature will always be against you and time is always running out. Having to think fast and to bring it all together in the end is what I like about it. I rarely start with a plan, just a vague notion of trying to do something different each time. Once I begin building and forms take shape I can start to see where things are going and either follow that road or attempt to contradict it with something unexpected. In my mind they are always mash-ups of influences and ideas. I see a castle, a fishing village, a modernist sculpture, a stage set for the oscars all at once. When they are successful they don’t feel contained or finished. They become organic machines that might grow and expand. I am always adding just one more bit and if time allowed I wouldn’t stop.

Seen here are a number of his designs from the last year but you can explore hundreds more over on Flickr. (via Laughing Squid, Adam Savage)

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Printed Short Stories That Double as Wine Bottle Labels

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Combining two of my favorite winter (or rather any season) activities is the project Librottiglia, a newly designed set of wines which feature short stories built into their labels. The texts are printed on textured paper stock, minimally designed, and secured to the bottle with a single piece of twine, providing an alternative to both digital methods of reading and traditional books. Not only are the selected works aesthetically matched to the bottle, but the content is also curated to align with the taste profiles, the characteristics of the work conceptually paired to each blend.

Three writers were selected to contribute to the project, each bringing their unique style to their matched wine. Journalist and satirist Danilo Zanelli contributes the mystery “Murder” to a Roero Arneis, “The Frog in the Belly,” a fable by Patrizia Laquidara is paired with an Anthos, and Regina Marques Nadaes’s love story “I Love You, Forget Me” compliments the winery’s Nebbiolo Roero.

The project is a partnership between the product design agency Reverse Innovation and Italian winery Matteo Correggia, and is named based off of the Italian translations of the words book (libro) and bottle (bottiglia). You can learn more about the project on Librottiglia’s website. (via designboom)

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My New Old Chair: Artist “Fixes” Broken Wood Furniture with Opposing Materials

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As part of her ongoing series titled My Old New Chair, visual artist Tatiane Freitas repairs broken wood furniture by replacing the missing pieces with translucent acrylic. Much like the Japanese practice of kintsugi or medieval parchment repair, her designs restore functionality to the chairs while acknowledging the history of each piece. One chair from the series was recently included in the Clairvoyance exhibition at Guy Hepner in New York, and you can see more of her latest work on her website and Instagram. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Side note: did you know the country of Sweden offers tax breaks to people who choose to repair household appliances and bicycles instead of throwing them away?

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Chairs and Other Sculptural Objects That Melt Into the Floor by Tatiana Blass

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In an installation titled Tails from 2006, Tatiana Blass (previously), presented several wooden chairs and other sculptural objects that seem to melt into the ground. The works merge with the floor through additions of specifically cut lacquered wood or fiber glass, solid forms that give the illusion of both brightly colored and woodgrain patterned liquid. The Brazilian artist is represented by Galeria Millan in Sao Paulo. You can see more of her past and present works on her website.

col. Alexandre Martins Fontes

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